The scientific monitoring period of the Scottish Beaver Trial came to an end in May 2014. In June 2015, Scottish Natural Heritage published the Beavers in Scotland Report.

On 24 November 2016, the Scottish Government made the landmark announcement that beavers are to remain in Scotland. For more information, please read the joint press release issued by RZSS and the Scottish Wildlife Trust.

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FAQ: Do beavers pose a flooding threat?

In general terms, beavers can actually help reduce the risk of flooding lower down in river systems by building dams and moderating water flow. The modifications made to the streams can raise the water table locally, creating wetland areas to the benefit of biodiversity. Evidence from elsewhere in Europe shows that instances of beaver dams creating undesirable flooding are uncommon, localised and usually small-scale. In these situations dams are simply removed or pipes (‘beaver deceivers’) are placed through them to manage water levels.

Beaver damming activities are tracked on the ground by the Scottish Beaver Trial field staff. The impact of damming by beavers were monitored as part of the independent scientific monitoring undertaken by Scottish Natural Heritage.

 

 

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The Royal Zoological Society of ScotlandScottish Wildlife Trust
Forestry Commission Scotland

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"I welcome the return of beavers to Knapdale. Beavers are fascinating creatures famed for their industrious habits, and their arrival to Knapdale is certainly creating a booming industry for local businesses." - Local businessman Darren Dobson, owner of the Cairnbaan Hotel

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